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    Notes and advice from Sean McColl.

Atlanta WC on Sportiva LIVE

I’ve written a nice post on Atlanta and am currently waiting for La Sportiva NA to publish it. It’s written along with some photos of the comp. Overall, it was a dissapointing finals mostly because of the length of the route. I finished 7th place and still climbed 60 moves… The route was good, just very out of my element, and I was therefore punished for it. I’m currently at the 24 heures du mur waiting for finals starting at 3:30pm. I managed to win last year, so crossing my fingers for this year! On Tuesday, the 9th of October, I leave with the Austrian and Dutch climbing team to Asia for 3 weeks of fun! It starts with the World Cup in Xining, followed by the WC in Mokpo, Korea and finishing with the WC in Inzai, Japan. I’m very excited to be heading to Korea and even more so Japan. It’ll be the first time visiting these countries and I’ve extended my stay after the last world cup to enjoy the Japanese culture with Sachi Amma and Akiyo Noguchi. I’ll be taking lots of pictures in Asia with a Panda called “Panda”. I’ll also try to film a small movie for Mammut!

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Comments (9)

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    Longtime climber

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    I watched the Atlanta video with interest but was shocked to hear that some competitors either dropped out/didn’t show/arrived late to the competition.

    I can understand being late, but what about those competitors who dropped out? Anyone else think this is bad form? I think it’s unfair. If a competitor dropped out, it’s only right–and fair–that a runner-up take their place in the next round.

    Imagine if you placed 9th in a round and the 8th place competitor didn’t show up in the next round. Wouldn’t you feel bad if you weren’t bumped up? I don’t know what it says in the IFSC rule book, but I would expect that a competitor’s commitment, or lack of, should be taken seriously. Sean, I hope that as president you will address this.

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      Sean McColl

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      I know that two Mexican climbers were late for the semi-finals isolation by over 30 minutes and were not allowed to compete. I did not hear of any other climber “dropping out”.

      As for your concern, I don’t think it’s bad form, or unfair at all. As per your example, if a competitor placed 9th and not 8th. If that 8th place person decided not to compete, they still deserve their 8th place position as they climbed well enough to make finals and the 9th person did not. On the other side of that argument, say the 1st place ranked person decided not to climb in finals, they would sacrifice their “potential” 1st place position and also drop to 8th place.

      Granted, it sucks for the 9th place person for missing finals by 1 spot, but you can argue that they should’ve just climbed a bit better… In every competition there is that person who is always looking in.

      Reply

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    danger

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    Sean, I know you mention on here and i think on twitter that the length of the route made it not your style. as a boulderer getting into sport recently i totally understand.

    However, Alex Johnson noted that on the finals route you used one of the last macro holds quite differently than some of the competitors who got further.

    I’m far from a top climber and i certainly didnt touch that hold, but climbing is at least as much mental is it is physical. Perhaps the “not my style” kind of thinking can be a limiting belief/self fulfilling prophecy?

    Anyways, cheers! you certainly climbed amazing during semi-finals and even though i think you could have gotten further, your finals performance was no joke!

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      Sean McColl

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      The reason I used the big hold differently was because I screwed up the downclimb and I was much more pumped when I got there. Normally I’d be able to rest like the others, but I just couldn’t after spending a minute trying to downclimb.

      As for the “mentality”; Before the route and during, I convince myself that it’s just another route and at the end, it comes down to one move after another. I never say it’s too long, and it’s only once it’s over that I reflect and say what I say.

      I know competition climbing is mostly mental and I’m one of the competitors that tries to remain the most positive during training and competition. I always look for positives and try to stray away from negatives.

      I also knew before I went to Atlanta that it would be super long routes, but I still chose to go. It’s a challenge for me, I still made finals, and then got overhauled. I turned it around and won the next one in China!

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        John Meget

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        Sean, how soon till you post your writeup of the China comp?

        btw, congrats on the huge win!

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          Sean McColl

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          as Mammut funded most of my trip, I gave it to them along with a few photos… I don’t know when they’ll be publishing it though.

          Reply

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    Alex

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    Still waiting to read that report from the Atlanta WC… Seems La Sportiva Live is anything but live…

    Reply

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      Sean McColl

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      yes I gather that. I might just post it tomorrow anyways.

      Reply

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    joanne

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    Please do! Devin wants to see your perspective on the Atlanta gym. 🙂

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